Shaping Te Upoko o te Ika: 2019 onwards!

From now, Talk Wellington will roll along like the other stalwart blogs of Wellington, publishing occasionally with minimal social media outreach. 

See who’s behind it, past and present.

Keepin’ it rolling

Talk Wellington has an extensive audience, and we hope to keep most of them!

We’ll do that by recalibrating expectations of fresh posting, and using alerts to give people a heads-up when there’s new content. (Make sure you’re signed up for the newsletter with the yellow popup, and you’ll hear what this arrangement will be.)

If you’d like to be a guest poster, ghost-writer or suggest a cross-post, that’s great. Get in touch – noting that there’s only one person (Isabella) currently doing all the things. 

More voices, more good kōrero

We may be a smaller animal now, but the information landscape has evolved. In the last wee while, we’ve observed Stuff.co.nz becoming noticeably more thoughtful and progressive in its transport coverage (and its new comments policy), and Newshub and TV1 showing greater interest in progressive angles on transport stories.  

More signs of the zeitgeist are showing on the fringes – where, as Rebecca Solnit reminds us, progress comes from.  Since we’ve been around there’s been a blossoming in the local blogosphere: new local ones like TraNZport and Inside Wellington, plus new Tauranga cousins and Christchurch cousins in blogland and on Medium), and in podcastland Indigenous Urbanism.

There’s been strong growth in aligned kaupapa groups like Women in Urbanism, Congestion Free Wellington and renewed vigour in Generation Zero. Plus Wellington’s got its foot in the burgeoning cohousing movement, and new Wellington groups like the Urban Justice Contemplaters are springing up.

They’re all adding to stalwart local blogs like Eye of the Fish and Island Bay Healthy Streets, who have great stamina and great content.

They’re all small, but it all means more well-informed and articulate folks putting pressure on decision-makers, and supporting regular people to do so too. It means better decisions giving us fairer, more sustainable, more liveable towns and cities.  

Coming together

The Wellington region, Te Upoko o te Ika / the Head of the Fish, is full of great little groups of people who share the big values of sustainability, fairness, accessibility, and liveability for all and for future generations.

We’re aware of a few nascent gatherings where people can “talk shop”, conspire, inspire and learn together. We’ll be publicising a few of these, and seeking to support ones that diversify the voices and actors involved with shaping our place. (Flick us a line if you want your gathering listed!)

Here’s one: Future Wellington. Kristin Louw says:

We’re looking to start a community of urbanists who care about the future of Wellington. We’ll going to call ourselves Future Wellington. We’re looking for people who have a willingness to engage and share knowledge and who will have an interest and passion in some of the diverse fields related to urbanism.
We’re looking to organise events including field trips to sites, buildings and spaces, film nights, socials, informal lunches and dinners, job and networking opportunities. 
The project is still in its infancy and for now we’re gauging interest. If you are interested, please fill in this Google Form and we’ll get back to you…  

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