Results

The following posts are filed under: community engagement.

Getting denser better: NIMBYism and developers (dispatch from San Diego)

Worldwide, unreasonable neighbour resistance (“Not In My Backyard”) is one of the greatest hurdles to the land-use intensification that modern cities need to be sustainable, accessible, and liveable. Talk Wellington are looking at different ways to overcome it – here, profiling some progressive developers’ coalitions in San Diego, California.

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Safer space for cycling (scooting): what’s going onwith (some of) us?

A recent piece on the sudden scuttling of a flagship London project for safer cycling, and local e-scooter hoo-ha, sparked a few thoughts about local opposition to infrastructure for safer cycling – and e-scooting.

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POP QUIZ: Which should we obsess expensively about? MOULD or METH?

One of them kills and debilitates thousands of Kiwis a year, especially the young.  It’s got simple solutions that don’t require expensive consultancy services.

The other causes nasty harm on a much smaller scale, but has a delightfully thrilling moral stink that’s seductively adjacent to beneficiary-bashing for those inclined that way.

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Fighting the “greater good”: protest, civics and civility

People around Levin stand to have their homes bought by force because they’re in the way of a new expressway. Talk Wellington ponders the local reactions when a local landscape is changed in the greater good – and features a post from a vastly different conflict environment

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Let’s Get Wellington MOVING! Today’s the day

Transport planning is a big deal. Large scale transport infrastructure affects everything around it, for decades.   In case you haven’t noticed, Let’s Get Wellington Moving  will profoundly shape our city, and the window is almost closed to give your steer on the approach they’re taking.  You can read more but regardless, get your feedback in…

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No Going Back?

Pomare’s redevelopment was “all about community engagement”, but did it ultimately serve the people who lived there? We ponder the commercial vs community pressures of public/private partnerships.  

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